• District Six “No matter where we are, we are here.”

    Mrs Abrahams (taken from the memory cloth, 1994)

    Corner of Hanover and Blythe Streets
    (Doner - Stan Abrahams)

    District Six was considered to be a health hazard and crime-ridden from the point of view of the residents; it certainly was a crowded place in which people lived cheek by jowl. Many had arrived from farms, and often every indoor space – single rooms, landings and hallways – were

    Chapel Street
    (Photographer: Bart Steyn)

    rented by whole families. At the same time, rack-renting occurred and profiteering landlords failed to maintain, repair, or paint buildings and properties. Drains were allowed to block up and rats ran wild. These conditions of neglect encouraged activities such as illegal gambling, sex-working and

    Oxford Place and De Villiers Streets
    (Donor - Jimmy Riadore)

    shebeening. Statements from the government and its supporters made it clear that they regarded District Six as a social evil. They drew attention to drug-peddling, roguery and violence, and claimed that District Six needed to be redeemed. It was in the language of “slum clearance” that the razing

    National Cinema,
    William Street
    (Doner - Stan Abrahams)

    of District Six was justified.

    District Six’s writers themselves drew attention to the “damp, battered” buildings, and “crumbling roads” (Alex La Guma, A Walk in the Night). La Guma described a thoroughfare in the following terms: “the corpse of a street that

    Eaton Place
    (Donor - Jimmy Riadore)

    died a long time ago, choked to death by neglect.” It was “left to be nudged and toed by the surrounding navels which lay on its crumbling flanks like hyenas waiting to devour it” (Alex La Guma, And a Threefold Cord). In La Guma’s descriptions, the streets of District Six were narrow

    Springfield Street, AME Church in background
    (Doner - Jan Greshoff)

    and garbage-filled, its alley-ways smelled of urine and in the dark and claustrophobic rooms and corridors of its grimy tenements, cockroaches and rats were often seen. Rive also paints a gloomy picture of urban squalor, poverty, and structural decay. In one scene he describes “a concrete

    Maidstone and
    Rochester Streets
    (Doner - Jan Greshoff)

    and garbage-filled, its alley-ways smelled of urine and in the dark and claustrophobic rooms and corridors of its grimy tenements, cockroaches and rats were often seen. Rive also paints a gloomy picture of urban squalor, poverty, and structural decay. In one scene he describes “a concrete enclosed area called The Big Yard into which all the occupants of the tenement threw their slops, refuse, and dirty water” (Richard Rive, Writing Black).

    View of Avalon Cinema from Russell Street
    (Doner - Sandra McGregor)

    “You know it’s only in the District that I feel safe. District Six is like an island in a sea of Apartheid. The whole of District Six is one big Apartheid, so we can’t see it. We only see it when the white man comes and forces it on us, when he makes us see it – when the police come, and the council people and so on – or when we leave the District…. Then we again see apartheid. I know the District is dirty and poor and a

    slum, as the newspapers always remind us, but it’s our own and we have never put up notices which say ‘Slegs Blankes’ or ‘Whites Only’. They put up the notices. When the white man comes into the District with his notices he is a stranger and when we come out of the District he makes us realise we are strangers. It’s funny but that’s the way I see it” (Richard Rive, Buckingham Palace).